29.09 - F. Bussolino, Istituto di Candiolo IRCCS

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Data dell'evento: 29/09/2014
seminars_2014

Lunedì 29 settembre - ore 14:00
Aula Seminari, NICO 

Transcription Factor EB and the development of cardiovascular system

Prof. Federico Bussolino
Istituto di Candiolo - IRCCS

TFBE belongs to the microphtalmia family of bHLH-leucine zipper transcription factors.
TFBE was originally described to be translocated in a juvenile subset of renal carcinomas and is implicated in the controls the autophagy-lysosomal pathway by recognizing a recurrent motif present in the promoter regions of more than 400 genes that participate to lysosome biogenesis (CLEAR network).

TFEB overexpression increases the number of lysosomes improving the capacity to degrade complex molecules by facilitating autophagosome assembly, in particular when cells are stressed by starvation and hypoxia. The functions of Tfeb are mainly regulated by mTOR comoplex1 (mTORc1. mTORc1-mediated Tfeb phosphorylation occurs at the lysosomal surface and enables Tfeb binding to 14-3-3 protein, which prevents nuclear import).

In this seminar I will discuss the recent data of my Lab illustrating the in vitro and in vivo activities of Tfeb in cardiovascular system.

Ospite: Alessandro Vercelli

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Agenda

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